Temasek Snail – A revisit

About two years ago, we launched a guidebook “A Guide to Snails and other Non-marine Molluscs of Singapore” to help enthusiasts find and identify snails and non-marine molluscs that can be found in Singapore, and to increase awareness and interest in the biology, ecology and shell forms of these molluscs.

The front cover picture of the guidebook featured the Temasek Snail (Amphidromus atricallosus temasek) and in the book, we mentioned how these native snails are confined to the older forests in Singapore. That was the first time I came across the Temasek Snail and two years have gone by since the few months of snail craze in our Department (read our past posts).

Garden Snail
Photo used for the cover page of “A Guidebook on Snails and other Non-marine Molluscs of Singapore”

In NParks’ recent newsletter article “Conserving The Singapore Green Tree Snail”, I was excited to read about the Temasek Snail again. It was highlighted that the snail, introduced in the article as the Singapore Green Tree Snail,  is endemic to Singapore and is facing a population decline due to rapid urbanisation and loss of habitat and exploitation by shell collectors. Hmm, shell collectors? Gosh, I do not wish to think about what they do to these endangered snails. 😦

It was however a relief to read on in the article that through a population and distribution study of the land snails in the Central Catchment Nature Reserve, preliminary results show that a healthy population of the Singapore Green Tree Snail still thrives within that area. The article ends with a call for people to refrain from collecting the snail shells which I thought we should echo. Hence, I would like to end off with a very common yet most relevant quotation for people who wanders into nature.

Take nothing but pictures

Leave nothing but footprints

If you are venturing into the nature reserve during this holiday season, let this be a gentle reminder for you!

4 responses to Temasek Snail – A revisit

  1. Danny says:

    Thanks for sharing this Kiat Teng. The image of the Temasek Snail invokes fond memories of our snails mini-exhibition back in 2012! It’s nice we still have a remnant of it with the wall artwork in place at the Western Entrance.

    A Guide to the Snails and other non-marine molluscs of Singapore is available for purchase from Science Centre’s Curiosity Shop as well as from our distributors!

    Like

    • Kiat Teng says:

      Yes indeed, Danny. I totally enjoyed checking out those snails at the mini-exhibition then! Thanks for putting it together so nicely!

      Like

  2. Sanjali says:

    And there’s something I thought would never happen in my life – an endangered specie of snails in Singapore !??Just goes to show, life is short but it doesn’t move at the pace of a snail!!

    Love that ending quote! Sends the message across in a perfectly concise manner! 😀

    Like

    • Kiat Teng says:

      Thanks Sanjali. If only more people can appreciate that nature is most beautiful where they originally belong, instead of taking them away from their home!

      Like

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